New Plastic and Packaging for BikeFit Products

Fantastic New Colored Plastic

We are excited to announce our new plastics and packaging for 2018!  Many of you may have seen these in your shipments already, but we’ve revamped plastic and packaging throughout the line to provide you with the best functioning (and looking) bike fitting products on the planet.

Unlike some other knock-offs in the industry, we insist on using high-density plastic for our 3mm Leg Length Shims(seen above).  For 2018, we decided to step away from the black on black on black on black and spice up our products with a smattering of color.  Our Universal (all 3-hole applications) and Look Keo models are a beautiful cobalt blue and our Speedplay and SPD/MTB 2-hole models sport a ferocious lavender.  Yes, we described lavender as ferocious.

Leg Length Shim Design and Availability

Our design on the Leg Length Shims remains largely the same.  We continue to “ramp” the front of the shim in order to provide optimal cleat/pedal engagement and safety for those who need them. 

For the most popular three-hole cleat models, our Look Keo Leg Length Shims are designed to use a smaller base plate that matches the cleats.  The Universal Leg 3mm Length Shims have a larger base plate and will fit any 3-hole type of cleat.  Our Speedplay Leg Length Shims are offered with either Walkable Screws or the old style V2 screws.

Beyond the plastic itself, we’ve also changed our packaging across the BikeFit product line to provide not only a strong visual of our shims, wedges, and extenders but also to aesthetically display products in fitting studios, bike shops, pain caves and indoor cycling facilities. Look for our new packaging at your local shop or on our site!

Does Cleat Stagger Remedy a Leg Length Discrepancy?

Cleat Stagger

What is Cleat Stagger?

When the cleat on one bike shoe is shifted forward and the other one positioned to the rear, rather than symmetrically aligned (see the photo above).

We tend to hear more about cleat stagger when it accompanies a comment suggesting that a particular anatomical leg length difference is located at the femur. With that information in mind, many fitters and cyclists consider staggering the cleats. Is this the right answer?

Things to Consider:

  1. How can you be sure the leg length difference is only in the femur?
  2. Are you sacrificing optimum cleat fore/aft position with cleat stagger?
  3. What other aspect(s) further up the chain is/are compromised by cleat stagger?  Are you sacrificing too much in order to avoid a simple solution?

We noticed that by addressing almost all leg length differences as a leg length discrepancy, you will most likely discover the best solution: a Leg Length Shim. This also tends to minimize other complications from the foot up that can possibly occur via cleat stagger.  Some of these sacrifices can include injury, pain, imbalance or loss of power.

Cleat Stagger

Find our for yourself!  Try both a cleat stagger and a Leg Length Shim separately.  In most cases, a bike fitter or BikeFit Pro will be able to observe better symmetry from the rear view.  For the individual, you will likely feel a distinct difference between the two.  Which one felt better? In our experience the preferred solution usually, if not always, includes the Leg Length Shim as the primary adjustment.  Some cyclists expressed that the cleat stagger drives them absolutely bonkers (medical expression).

Lastly, remember with all leg length issues, it is best to have a bike fitter or BikeFit Pro check your posture on multiple shaped saddles.   Some different saddle shapes mask the potential asymmetrical movements often associated with a leg length issue. Only by checking your posture on a few different saddles can you assure you have indeed addressed the difference as well as possible.

At BikeFit, only after installing the shim is staggering the cleat ever-so-slightly a consideration we make in order to fine-tune.  Even then, it is rare at best.

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